skip to content »

music-plugin.ru

Visitenkarte selber machen online dating

For example, Eskenazi has a small stone Tang-era sculpture of a crouching rabbit on sale for $23,000.Chinese furniture with imperial connections commands a huge premium: A Qing Dynasty bed made from exotic hardwoods went for $847,500 at a Christie's sale in New York in September.

Art mavens are buying contemporary works as well Back in the 1960s and 1970s, when Jim Eccles was working as an IBM (IBM ) systems engineer, he fell in love with the work of the late Chinese artist Chao Chung Hsiang, who was then living in New York."The Chinese don't understand why there's such a big price difference between Western art and the greatest Chinese art," says Henry Howard-Sneyd, Sotheby's Hong Kong-based managing director for China and Southeast Asia.For instance, while a Picasso painting sold this spring for $104 million, works by Zhang Daqian, who lived from 1899 to 1983 and is known as "China's Picasso," usually top out at about $1 million.Chinese collectors figure Zhang's paintings should eventually approach Picasso's level. "Oh, God, no," says David Tang, the Hong Kong entrepreneur and art collector who argues that the rise of the Chinese art market "is just beginning." Before you make any purchases, there are a few things you should know. Fakes and copies are rife, particularly of classic paintings and furniture, and even the experts can be fooled.If you're buying within China, stick to recent works. Vielleicht liegt es einfach daran, dass ihnen bei der Anlage ihres Nicks nicht bewusst ist, dass es sich um eine Art kleiner Visitenkarte handelt.

Tatsächlich sind die meisten Internetuser von eher zurückhaltender Kreativität, wenn es um die Wahl des eigenen Nicknamens geht.

Now 69 and retired, Eccles still loves the seven colorful paintings, some abstract and others in a more traditional Chinese style, that he bought for $200 to $500 each. Based on recent auction sales, he figures they can fetch $50,000 to $100,000 each.

With the emergence of free-spending, nouveau riche collectors from mainland China, the Chinese art market is at the start of what may be an extended boom.

Check out Christie's snuff bottle sale in March, 2005, and the selection of London dealer Robert Hall at

You can also find bargains in China's far-out contemporary art.

But older softwood pieces with no imperial associations sold for as little as $5,000.