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Separated people dating

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Many worshipped in established, predominantly white congregations, but by the late 18th century, blacks had begun to congregate in self-help and benevolent associations called African Societies.

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In the 1500s, the Portuguese conquered both kingdoms and carried Catholicism to West Africa.In the 1830s and 1840s, Southern churchmen undertook an active campaign to persuade plantation owners that slaves must be brought into to the Christian fold.Because plantations were located far from churches, this meant that the church had to be carried to the plantation.Some white owners allowed the enslaved to worship in white churches, where they were segregated in the back of the building or in the balconies.Occasionally persons of African descent might hear a special sermon from white preachers, but these sermons tended to stress obedience and duty, and the message of the apostle Paul: "Slaves, obey your masters." Both Methodists and Baptists made active efforts to convert enslaved Africans to Christianity; the Methodists also licensed black men to preach.Here they provided the hard manual labor that supported the South's biggest crops: cotton and tobacco.

In the South, Anglican ministers sponsored by the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, founded in England, made earnest attempts to teach Christianity by rote memorization; the approach had little appeal.

In time, a Second and a Third African Church were formed, also led by black pastors.

In the North, blacks had more authority over their religious affairs.

Remarkably, a few black preachers in the South succeeded in establishing independent black churches.

In the 1780s, a slave named Andrew Bryan preached to a small group of slaves in Savannah, Ga. Despite persecution and harassment, the church grew, and by 1790 it became the First African Baptist Church of Savannah.

In 1787, for example, Richard Allen and Absalom Jones organized the Free African Society of Philadelphia, which later evolved into two congregations: the Bethel Church, the mother church of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) denomination, and St.