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Proper protocol online dating

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This paper describes an XML vocabulary for schemas.One immediate implication of these ideas is a substantive part of the functionalities of XML document types can now be described using the XML instance syntax itself, rather than DTD syntax.

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XML is fully internationalized for both European and Asian languages, with all conforming processors required to support the Unicode character set in both its UTF-8 and UTF-16 encodings. Abstract: "The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a subset of SGML that is completely described in this document.The language is designed for the quickest possible client-side processing consistent with its primary purpose as an electronic publishing and data interchange format." [971208 W3C press release] "XML documents are made up of storage units called entities, which contain either parsed or unparsed data. Its goal is to enable generic SGML to be served, received, and processed on the Web in the way that is now possible with HTML. Announced at the SGML/XML '97 Conference in Washington, D. See the press release, or a press release, alternate source.Parsed data is made up of characters, some of which form the character data in the document, and some of which form markup. XML has been designed for ease of implementation and for interoperability with both SGML and HTML." Sources: [see W3C for additional translations] [December 08 [12], 1997] Extensible Markup Language (XML) 1.0, issued as a W3C Proposed Recommendation. Editors: Tim Bray (Textuality and Netscape), Jean Paoli (Microsoft), and C. Sperberg-Mc Queen (University of Illinois at Chicago). XML WG Chair Jon Bosak clarified the WG's new work focus in light of the publication of this PR.The Document Object Model Level 2 builds on the Document Object Model Level 1.Level 2 adds interfaces for a Cascading Style Sheets object model, an event model, and a query interface, amongst others." On October 1, 1998, the World Wide Web Consortium published the Document Object Model (DOM) Level 1 Specification, Version 1.0 as a W3C Recommendation.This specification describes the required behavior of an XML processor in terms of how it must read XML data and the information it must provide to the application." [adapted from the Proposal] Valid XML documents are designed to be valid SGML documents, but XML documents have additional restrictions. Several other W3C specifications are also critical to the understanding and implementation of XML as it is currently used. Editors: Tim Bray (Textuality and Netscape), Jean Paoli (Microsoft), and C. Sperberg-Mc Queen (University of Illinois at Chicago). Obviously, many of these application areas provide exemplary models, having unquestioned integrity and high quality.

The W3C XML WG has published a technical NOTE providing a "detailed comparison of the additional restrictions that XML places on documents beyond those of SGML": see for the details. (XML Co-editor); Dan Connolly, W3C; Steve De Rose, INSO; Dave Hollander, HP; Eliot Kimber, Highland; Eve Maler, Arbor Text; Tom Magliery, NCSA; Murray Maloney, Muzmo and Grif; Makoto Murata, Fuji Xerox Information Systems; Joel Nava, Adobe; Peter Sharpe, Soft Quad; John Tigue, Data Channel." Historically: The W3C SGML Editorial Review Board, as of November 5, 1996, had the following members: Jon Bosak, Sun ([email protected]), chair; Tim Bray, Textuality ([email protected]), editor; James Clark ([email protected]), technical lead; Dan Connolly ([email protected]), W3C contact; Steve De Rose, EBT ([email protected]), editor; Dave Hollander, HP ([email protected]); Eliot Kimber, Passage Systems ([email protected]); Tom Magliery, NCSA ([email protected]); Eve Maler, Arbor Text ([email protected]); Jean Paoli, Microsoft ([email protected]); Peter Sharpe, Soft Quad ([email protected]); C. These specifications are being developed by various working groups, sometimes as part of activity outside the sphere of the XML Activity. Some already play a vital role in profitable commercial enterprise.

The good news is this: Net users are seeing clearly that a fixed tag set (like HTML) is not the solution. See the references for TEI - the XML version in a separate document, and the section 'Academic Applications' for background on the SGML version of the TEI DTD.

"My Netscape Network (MNN) is a free Netcenter service that lets you create your own My Netscape channel.

A new Netsape document describes how to apply MCF using XML, the Extensible Markup Language." Links: On January 5, 1998, a new (revised) submission on XML-Data was presented to the W3C by Microsoft, Arbor Text, Data Channel, and Inso. Authors: Andrew Layman, Edward Jung, Eve Maler, Henry S. It can be used for classes which as strictly syntactic (for example, XML) or those which indicate concepts and relations among concepts (as used in relational databases, KR graphs and RDF).

The former are called 'syntactic schemas;' the latter 'conceptual schemas.' The text of this NOTE thus "provides a specification (XML-Data) for describing and exchanging structured and networked data on the Web.

XML was initially "developed by a W3C Generic SGML Editorial Review Board formed under the auspices of the W3 Consortium in 1996 and chaired by Jon Bosak of Sun Microsystems, with the very active participation of a Generic SGML Working Group also organized by the W3C." An XML WG (Working Group) under W3C served initially as an editorial board, which received input from an XML Special Interest Group.