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Nighma sixy

I'm convinced now that had it been decently produced (and sadly, it probably wouldn't have been) it could have made for a pretty good episode. In fact I’d forgotten I had this – a novelisation of a story which was planned for 1985 but which was cancelled along with the season it was intended for. Yes, Virgin Books, BBC Books and Big Finish took enormous strides in making the character more likeable than his early TV incarnation would have suggested, but I’d argue that the process began in what turned out to be Baker’s final set of episodes.

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The character of a very early Sixy is captured quite well.I'm convinced now that had it been decently produced (and sadly, I listened to the Big Finish audio of this first and despite the fact that it is virtually identical at least in story and dialogue, I think I liked the book version just a bit better.The character of a very early Sixy is captured quite well. A lot of people don’t like the season that replaced this one – the overarching ‘Trial of a Time Lord’ story – but where it scores over the stories whose place it took is the way it refined Colin Baker’s Doctor as a good-natured hero rather than the bombastic, argumentative, verbose leading man he started life as.Or is their arrival somehow connected with the sinister presence of a rather familiar Chinese Mandarin?I listened to the Big Finish audio of this first and despite the fact that it is virtually identical at least in story and dialogue, I think I liked the book version just a bit better.Far be it from me to credit Michael Grade with making a sensible decision, but I don’t think the world is a sorrier place for ‘The Nightmare Fair’ never making it to the screen. What I find less easy to accept is, having decided to bring back the Toymaker, we don’t learn anything new about him. Unremarkable. is a comeback story in a couple of ways: Williams had been the producer of Doctor Who in the later Tom Baker era, now returning to try his hand at writing a script for the show; and the villain is the Celestial Toymaker, who had featured in a 1966 story turning William Hartnell's Doctor invisible and subjecting companions Dodo and Steven to playing a series of deadly games.

It’s too derivative – almost as if the producer and script editor had a shopping list of elements they wanted to include. This time round the Toymaker has set up shop in Black is a comeback story in a couple of ways: Williams had been the producer of Doctor Who in the later Tom Baker era, now returning to try his hand at writing a script for the show; and the villain is the Celestial Toymaker, who had featured in a 1966 story turning William Hartnell's Doctor invisible and subjecting companions Dodo and Steven to playing a series of deadly games.

(A simple 'The Doctor fiddled with the device for a moment.' would have been an improvement.) And just what WAS Geoff doing during all this?

Another under-rated classic..time, a classic that NEVER happened.

But missing from the Doctor's adventures was the series that would have been made and shown during those eighteen months, and contained in this volume is one of those stories: The Nightmare Fair Drawn into the nexus of the primeval cauldron itself, the Doctor and Peri are somewhat surprised to find themselves at Blackpool Pleasure Beach.

Is it really just chance that has brought them to the funfair?

There's a sonic screwdriver cum magic wand that wouldn't be present.