skip to content »

Macarthur chronicle campbelltown online dating

macarthur chronicle campbelltown online dating-11

Another address, signed by eight hundred and thirty-three residents, was presented to Governor Bligh, expressive of their confidence in his administration in the year 1808. The old denominational school system came to an end by the erection and opening: of the present Public School in 1870. However, it is known that Governor King gave him forty gallons of spirits as a reward for some service rendered on May 27th, 1806. It is evident that Andrew Thompson did traffic pretty largely in spirits, for he was fined £100 in 1807 for so doing. Again, we find in 1800 a reference to the profits made on the sale of spirits by Andrew Thompson, the Governor's bailiff. vii., page 225.) He acquired a number of properties by purchase, including property in Baker Street and in Bridge Street, Windsor.

Cox, Esq., principal magistrate of the Hawkesbury." The year 1810 thus marks the beginning of the town of Windsor, for in that year Governor Macquarie, having visited all the settlements along the Hawkesbury, issued the above instructions to lay out townships on the high ground. Andrew Thompson was appointed chief magistrate for the district, but he died in the same year, and was succeeded by William Cox. A burial ground was approved of, and a military hospital established. An older article runs through the Windsor Magazine published in 1857. Wooden wharf for one-hundred-ton boats, and a ferry punt. There had been another Court House previous to 1821, but it was discarded. A local fair was held, regarding which we clip the following advertisement from the Government Gazette;—"Windsor Annual Fair. The latter died on 12th January, 1838, aged 61 years. In the thirties a great change came over the street formation of Windsor. His was the first interment there, the ground not being fenced nor consecrated until shortly after (11th, May, 1611). The following obituary notice of Andrew Thompson appeared in the Sydney Gazette, 27th October, 1810:— "Died at Hawkesbury, Green Hills, on Monday, 22nd instant, after a lingering and severe illness, aged 37 years, Andrew Thompson, Esq., Magistrate of that district. Aged 37 years, and was buried October 25th, 1810.—Robert Cartwright." A memo after this entry says: "A. was the first corpse buried in the new church-yard at Windsor." The inscription on his tombstone in St. This tour occupied the time from 6th November to 13th December, 1810:— "The frequent inundations of the rivers Hawkesbury and Nepean having been hitherto attended with the most calamitous effects, with regard to crops growing in their vicinity, and in consequence of most serious injury to the necessary subsistence of the colony, the Governor has deemed it expedient (in order to guard as far as human foresight can extend against the recurrence of such calamities), to erect certain townships in the most contiguous and eligible high grounds in the several districts subjected to those inundations for the purpose of rendering every possible accommodation and security to the settlers whose farms are exposed to the floods. It is probably the building still standing behind the police barracks. West's House are on a small scale, and the latter in a very dilapidated state." "Court House (with plan).—The building is so badly executed that tho' it has not been built two years, strong settlements are showing themselves in the walls and ceilings, and the interior accommodations are not at all adapted for the purpose intended, as the plan will show." "General Observations.—The author of this report, etc., etc., would advert to the expensive and insufficient plan pursued in making and repairing bridges—the one now re-building at Windsor is a proof of this assertion, for instead of throughing over a stout truss'd and framed wooden bridge of one arch (which from the bold situation of the banks might have been done at little more cost than what is now expended) the same principle is still followed as that at first introduced into the colon; by placing piles in the sides and bed of the river, which collect all the rubbish continually floating down, and in the event of a flood must unavoidably destroy every bridge so constructed." With regard to this report we may say that the Court House stands to-day strong and solid, and in constant use, and likely to last for many years to come. Matthew's Church, but it seems as strong and hard to-day as it was ninety years ago. On 10th August, 1829, the first Circuit Court was opened in Windsor by Judge Stephen. John Howe, in December, 1809, he having had on sale "Woollens, drapery, and all sorts of lines." Governor Macquarie landed in New South Wales 28th December, 1809, and took over the administration of affaire of the colony 1st January, 1810, from Lieutenant Governor Foveaux, and on 12th January, 1810, less than a fortnight after his arrival, Governor Macquarie made Andrew Thompson a Justice of the Peace, and appointed him as Chief Magistrate for the district of the Hawkesbury. In pursuance of this plan, and with a view to the prosperity of the country, he has already fixed upon the most eligible situations within the several districts bordering on these rivers, and marked out on the several Commons where the townships are to be established, and each settler will be assigned an allotment of ground for a dwelling house, offices, garden, corn-yard, and stock yard, proportioned to the extent of the farm he holds within the influence of the floods; but it is to be clearly understood that the allotments so given, being intended as places of security for the produce of the lands on the banks of the Hawkesbury and Nepean, cannot be sold or alienated in any manner whatever, but with the farms to which they are from the commencement to be annexed, and they are to be always considered as forming an inseparable part of the said farms. Thomas Bayliss was tried for house-breaking at Mulgrave, and was executed on 31st October, 1829. Governor Macquarie reports that on 30th April, 1810, Andrew Thompson was received at the Governor's table, in Sydney, along with Simeon Lord, an opulent Sydney merchant, and Dr. Another object of these grain depots was to better control the price of grain, as in times of scarcity the local farmers charged most exorbitant prices, and also tried to prevent importation. On the arrival of Governor Macquarie's successor, Sir Thomas Brisbane, he called for a report on the public buildings of the colony. The milk returns sent by Andrew Thompson to him amounted to £60 0s. In the performance of this heroic work his health was seriously undermined. The foundation stone of a brick chapel, thirty-two feet by sixteen feet, was laid by the Rev. The first era of the history of Green Hills ends here, and the second stage in its history as Windsor begins. Extract from Government and General Order, dated 15th December, 1810, issued on the return of his Excellency Governor Macquarie from an extensive tour of inspection through the various districts where agriculture and the breeding of cattle have occupied the attention of settlers. We have quoted from this report, which was made in 1824, in the articles dealing with the Hospital, St. This is a fitting place to insert some further particulars as to the expenditure and the condition of certain other Windsor buildings:— Extracts from report of the value of the improvements which have taken place in the Public Buildings of Sydney, Parramatta, Windsor, Liverpool, and Campbelltown, from December 25th, 1822, to December 24th, 1823, and an expose of the present state of Public Buildings in New South Wales, by order of his Excellency Sir Thomas Brisbane, made by S. Harris, Architect, in 1824:— "Commissariat Offices, etc.—The office is a shed adjoining the end of the store, about eighty feet long, with two storeys." "The School Room, Old Hospital, Store, and Dr. Andrew Thompson also had a large store-keeping business at the Green Hills (Windsor), which, according to an advertisement in the Sydney Gazette, was taken over by Mr. It was really the growth of grain, wheat and maize that led Governor Macquarie to lay out, among others, the town of Windsor, in order to preserve the produce being lost by inundations after it had been harvested. This petition was signed by one hundred and fifty-six persons, among whom were Messrs. Arndell, Thomas Hobby, Andrew Thompson, George Crossley, John Dight, C. His son-in-law, Captain Putland, also had land adjoining. Methodist Church, formerly known as the Wesley an Church, has a very long and interesting history in Windsor.

We find, therefore, that several large granaries were built at the Green Hills, at first constructed of logs, and afterwards brick buildings of two and three stories. Captain Putland died in 1808, and was buried first in old St. The first Wesleyan class-meeting was held in 1812, when six members were enrolled, and the number soon increased to nineteen. Carvosso arrived in New South Wales in 1820, and was settled at Windsor the same year. The Wesleyan Church took a keen interest in missionary affairs, especially from 1820 to 1830, and some large missionary meetings were held.

The first Presbyterian Church was opened at Ebenezer in 1809. He had a house, known as the Red House, on his farm near Magrath's Hill (see illustration). Another meeting, probably called by Andrew Thompson, was held at his house in 1807, when it was decided to send a petition of sympathy to Governor Bligh. Andrew Thompson was appointed auctioneer for the Hawkesbury district by the Lieutenant-Governor, on the 21st January, 1809.

It is still used for Divine service, and is now the oldest church building in Australasia. In 1872 printed rules for Ham Common were issued by the trustees, who at that time were: W. He also had a large house and land in Bridge Street, Windsor, still known as Thompson's Square. This was signed by five hundred and forty-six persons. On 31st March, 1810, he was appointed a trustee and commissioner of the turnpike road from Sydney to Windsor, along with D'Arcy, Wentworth, and Simeon Lord, by Governor Macquarie. A site for a manse was dedicated on 14th March, 1851, in Thompson Square, near the Windsor Bridge, containing one rood seven perches.

His history and numerous occupations are fully dealt with in another place. The time occupied on the journey was sixteen hours, and William Roberts was the enterprising coachman. In connection with the brewery he also kept a public-house. In the year 1826 the members of the Windsor chapel raised the large sum of three hundred and fifty-six pounds, nineteen shillings for missionary work.

In the year 1802 the Gist bridge (a floating structure) was built over the South Creek. Trustees: Mathew Lock, Edward Robinson, Henry Baldwin. Ship and boat building was parried on at tins time along the banks of the Hawkesbury, to which reference is made in Chapter II. In 1880 two of these were replaced by Benjamin Richards and David Cobcroft. Dean Hallinan left Windsor, after a ministry of twenty-two years in the Roman Catholic Church. Another industry he started was the manufacture of salt. The leading Wesleyan laymen in these early days were:—Messrs.

The same figures will be found in Waugh's Almanac for 1859. They were all local men, judging by their names: John Howe (leader), and his son-in-law George Loder, Andrew Howe, William Dargan, Philip Thornley, and Benjamin Singleton, after whom a northern town is named. It is interesting to notice the rapid development of the town of Windsor and district during the regime of Governor Macquarie. We have difficulty in locating the buildings numbered 6, 7, 8, and 9. A few years after, what was known as Cope's Farm was sold. Thompson was enabled to accumulate considerable property, and what was more valuable to him, to possess the confidence of some of the most distinguished characters of this country, the consciousness of which surmounted the private solicitude of re-visiting his native country, and led him rather to yield to the wish of passing the evening of his life where his manhood had been meritoriously exerted, than of returning to the land which gave him birth. Thompson's intrinsic good qualities were appreciated by his Excellency the present Governor (Macquarie), who soon after his arrival here was pleased to appoint him a Magistrate, for which situation Mr. This act, which restored him to that rank in Society which he had lost, made so deep an impression on his grateful heart as to induce him to bequeath to the Governor one-fourth of his Fortune.