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Lokalavisen lemvig online dating

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In 2010, the city council voted to change the name from "Århus" to "Aarhus" to strengthen the international profile of the city. Certain geographically affiliated names have been updated to reflect the name of the city, such as the Aarhus River, changed from "Århus Å" to "Aarhus Å".

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Today Aarhus is at the cultural and economic core of the region and the largest centre for trade, services and industry in Jutland.Some Danish cities resisted the new spelling of their names, notably Aalborg and Aabenraa.Århus city council explicitly embraced the new spelling, as it was thought to enhance an image of progressiveness.Many public and religious buildings were built in and around the city; notably Aarhus Cathedral was initiated in the late 12th century by the influential bishop Peder Vognsen.In 1441, Christopher III issued the oldest known charter granting market town status although similar privileges may have existed as far back as the 12th century.Whichever spelling local authorities choose, most newspapers and public institutions will accept it.

Some official authorities such as the Danish Language Committee, publisher of the Danish Orthographic Dictionary, still retain "Århus" as the main name, providing "Aarhus" as a new, second option, in brackets and some institutions are still using "Århus" explicitly in their official name, such as the local newsmedia Århus Stiftstidende and the schools Århus Kunstakademi and Århus Statsgymnasium for example.

Parts of the ramparts are still in existence today and can be experienced as steep slopes at the riverside and they have also survived in some place names of the inner city, including the streets of Volden (The Rampart) and Graven (The Moat).

Aarhus grew to become one of the largest cities in the country by the early 16th century.

The charter is the first official recognition of the town as a regional power and is by some considered Aarhus' birth certificate.

The official and religious status spurred growth so in 1477 the defensive earthen ramparts, ringing the town since the Viking age, were abandoned to accommodate expansion.

There are strong indications of a former royal residence from the Viking Age in Viby, a few kilometres south of the Aarhus city centre.