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Downriver dating site

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The boats were ordered out & a gig with all the ship's papers was swamped & lost. 22, 1875, the vessel struck three times on a reef to the westward of Dog Island, maybe at West Cay. The pumps were manned but the vessel had 2 feet of water 'in the well' which rapidly became 6 feet.

It would be good to have one or two of those images on site, wouldn't it! Which list includes unnumbered vessels built as much as 43 years prior to the very first Miramar listing. 13, 1875, the vessel, under the command of Alexander Oppen & with a crew of 13 all told, left Demerera, (South America, now Guyana) bound for London with a general cargo. The entire crew took to a longboat which stood by Madeline for a while, lost sight of her in a squall, & never saw her again. Ord & Co., of Sunderland, to trade with South America. And in 1874/75 Lloyd's Register, the owner is recorded as being G. The yard would seem to have been known as the 'Wear Dockyard'. It would be good to be able to provide on this page some images of the early members of the Austin family, from contemporary prints or from other sources. The 'pontoon' is under Westburn, the vessel at right, built in 1929. I understand it was a giant platform which essentially rested on the bed of the River Wear & could raise a vessel out of the water & lower it back down again. 'Imagine' calls it a 'submersible barge' in their page re 'Austin's Pontoon, Sunderland', which features a print (of unknown date) by Herbert William Simpson (1907-1972). I think that the main 'Austin' yard may have closed in early 1960 & the business was relocated to Pallion. Tom's father and mother are both in the launching party - his father 8th from the right & his mother 5th from the left. For service from Sunderland to the Mediterranean, with J. The ship was then abandoned & became a total wreck. The Court concluded that Beane had caused the loss of Mora by neglecting to verify the vessel's position by the frequent use of the lead.

The only image I have seen so far, related to the yard at all, is an image of Mr. Fireside, built in 1942, is beside her & Borde, built in 1953, is the ship in the near left rear. Can anybody advise re the origin of what is a truly fine image. The first image on this 'pdf' page (thanks City of Sunderland! Tom has provided launch images with everyone identified re 4 vessels (Ardingly, Borde, Hackney & Wallarah) & also another launching image with an 'identity' problem. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into 1876 grounding & loss, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book), 2 (ownership in 1858). The Court suspended his certificate for 3 months, but suggested he should be granted a mate's certificate.

Austin, page bottom (have had to disable it, a beautiful Lake Applet featuring a frog, since it makes access to the whole page impossible. To search for specific text on this page, just press 'CTRL F' & then enter your search term. At a date after 1826, but at a date unstated, Peter Austin was joined in the business by his son, also named Peter Austin. It is interesting to read there that Robert Thompson, (1797-1860), also served his apprenticeship at the Allison yard. I presume, however, that they mean a site on the south bank of the River Wear, east of but close to the road bridge. I am advised, however, that 'The Standard' of London, referred on Nov. I think that the vessel was 'Choice' rather than 'The Choice' however. And that the company published a large series of stereo images of WW1, 'The Great War'. In 1856, per Turnbull's Register, & in Christie's Shipping Register of 1858 the vessel was owned by Thomas Wilson, & Wm. Now LR continues to record 'Wilson' as the vessel's owner & J.

Forgive me saying it, but a most confusing 2 1/2 page text indeed. ) tells us that Peter Austin (1) took over, in 1833, the shipbuilding yard of the Allison family, who were in the shipbuilding business in Sunderland from 1818 to 1833. And where is 'the site now occupied by the Company' - the word 'now' presumably meaning 1846. In 1869 they built their last wooden ship, "The Choice", and the yard changed over to iron shipbuilding.

'Ritson & Co.' presumably later changed their name & by the 1876/77 register, 'F. At this point, I am unable to tell you what finally happened to her.

The vessel would seem to have traded initially to India & later to Japan. Nilsen' chosen to change the name of the vessel or had sold it.

The vessel is not recorded in the 1882/83 edition, the next that I have, at least not as Thomas Wood, though it is quite possible that it was still listed there under another name had 'V. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into the 1875 wreck, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book).