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The entire jurisdiction lies within the Common Travel Area of the British Isles and is not a member of the European Union, but has a special relationship with it, being treated as part of the European Community with access to the single market for the purposes of free trade in goods.Taken together with the separate jurisdictions of Alderney and Sark it forms the Bailiwick of Guernsey.

The eastern end of the former channel became the town and harbour (from 1820) of St Sampson's, now the second biggest port in Guernsey. The roadway called "The Bridge" across the end of the harbour at St Sampson's recalls the bridge that formerly linked the two parts of Guernsey at high tide.It is thought to be a 3rd-century Roman cargo vessel and was probably at anchor or grounded when the fire broke out.In 933 AD, the Cotentin Peninsula including Avranchin which included the islands, were placed by the French King Ranulf under the control of William I.Maritime trade suffered a major decline with the move away from sailing craft as materials such as iron and steel were not available on the island.Le Braye du Valle was a tidal channel that made the northern extremity of Guernsey, Le Clos du Valle, a tidal island.It lies roughly north of St Malo and to the west of the Cotentin Peninsula.

With several smaller nearby islands, it forms a jurisdiction within the Bailiwick of Guernsey, a Crown dependency.

The allegiance was not total, however; there were a few Royalist uprisings in the southwest of the island, while Castle Cornet was occupied by the Governor, Sir Peter Osborne, and Royalist troops.

In December 1651, with full honours of war, Castle Cornet surrendered - the last Royalist outpost anywhere in the British Isles to surrender.

Wars against France and Spain during the 17th and 18th centuries gave Guernsey shipowners and sea captains the opportunity to exploit the island's proximity to mainland Europe by applying for letters of marque and turning their merchantmen into privateers.

By the beginning of the 18th century, Guernsey's residents were starting to settle in North America, The early 19th century saw a dramatic increase in the prosperity of the island, due to its success in the global maritime trade, and the rise of the stone industry.

During the Marian persecutions, three women, the Guernsey Martyrs, were burned at the stake for their Protestant beliefs.