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Biblical view on dating after divorce

About the tenth day, generally, the whole contents of the cauldron are in a liquefied state, upon which a fleece, from which the grease has been cleansed, is plunged into it by way of making trial; but until such time as the colour is found to satisfy the wishes of those preparing it, the liquor is still kept on the boil.

The dye was greatly prized in antiquity because the colour did not easily fade, but instead became brighter with weathering and sunlight.David Jacoby remarks that "twelve thousand snails of Murex brandaris yield no more than 1.4 g of pure dye, enough to colour only the trim of a single garment." from the Caribbean zone of the western Atlantic, can also produce a similar substance (which turns into an enduring purple dye when exposed to sunlight) and this ability has sometimes also been historically exploited by local inhabitants in the areas where these snails occur (Some other predatory gastropods, such as some wentletraps in the family Epitoniidae, seem to also produce a similar substance, although this has not been studied or exploited commercially).The dog whelk Nucella lapillus, from the North Atlantic, can also be used to produce red-purple and violet dyes.Its significance is such that the name Phoenicia means 'land of purple.' The expense meant that purple-dyed textiles became status symbols, and early sumptuary laws restricted their uses.The production of Tyrian purple was tightly controlled in Byzantium and was subsidized by the imperial court, which restricted its use for the colouring of imperial silks.The wool is left to lie in soak for five hours, and then, after carding it, it is thrown in again, until it has fully imbibed the colour.

Archaeological data from Tyre indicate that the snails were collected in large vats and left to decompose.

speculate that the dye extracted from the Bolinus brandaris is known as argaman (ארגמן) in Biblical Hebrew.

Another dye extracted from a related sea snail, Hexaplex trunculus, produced a blue colour which could be the one known as tekhelet (תְּכֵלֶת), used in garments worn for ritual purposes.

The colour-fast (non-fading) dye was an item of luxury trade, prized by Romans, who used it to colour ceremonial robes.

Used as a dye, the colour shifts from blue (peak absorption at 590 nm, which is yellow-orange) to reddish-purple (peak absorption at 520 nm, which is green).

strong fishy smell, which appears to be as lasting as the color itself." Murex purple was a very important industry in many Phoenician colonies and Carthage was no exception.