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Anti homosexual websites

The church has publicly articulated its belief that homosexuality is unacceptable, stating: Scripture opposes homosexual practices by direct comment and also by clearly implied disapproval.The Bible treats such practices as self-evidently abnormal. Attempts to establish or promote such relationships as viable alternatives to heterosexually-based family life do not conform to God's will for society.

For example, the Chick-fil-A Foundation gave more than $1 million in 2015 (nearly one-sixth of its total grants) to the the Fellowship of Christian Athletes.They further add: "The Salvation Army embraces employees of many different faiths and orientations and abides by all applicable anti-discrimination laws in its hiring." These statements completely ignore the reality that the Salvation Army continues to maintain anti-gay theological stances, and continues to discriminate against its own employees and their partners.They also neglect to mention that the organization historically "abides" by anti-discrimination laws by way of shutting down services in areas where such laws apply.These links were previously provided as resources under the Salvation Army's section on dealing with "sexual addictions." "Without discrimination" -- myth or fact?The Salvation Army has recently attempted to counter this perception of the church as homophobic, scrubbing explicitly anti-gay statements from its websites and issuing missives purportedly "debunking" the "myth" of its anti-LGBT stances.The deal fell through after it was publicized by the 2012 — The Salvation Army of Burlington, Vermont allegedly fired case worker Danielle Morantez immediately after discovering she was bisexual.

The church's employee handbook reads, in part, "The Salvation Army does reserve the right to make employment decisions on the basis of an employee's conduct or behavior that is incompatible with the principles of The Salvation Army." Later that year, Salvation Army spokesperson Major George Hood reaffirmed the church's anti-gay beliefs, saying: 2013 — The Salvation Army continues to remove links from its website to religious ministries providing so-called "ex-gay" conversion therapy, such as Harvest USA and Pure Life Ministries.

1998 — The Salvation Army of the United States chose to turn down $3.5 million in contracts with the city of San Francisco, resulting in the closure of programs for the homeless and senior citizens.

The church backed out of these contracts due to San Francisco's requirement that city contractors must provide spousal benefits to both same-sex partners and opposite-sex partners of employees.

The group takes the view that, “The Bible is clear in teaching on sexual sin including sex outside of marriage and homosexual acts.

Neither heterosexual sex outside of marriage nor any homosexual act constitute an alternative lifestyle acceptable to God.” The foundation also gave more than $200,000 to the Paul Anderson Youth Home, a Georgia-based “transformative organization” that operates a “Christian residential home for troubled youth.” Focusing on boys, their teachings include the idea that the “sexual, physical, and mental abuse of children, mostly in the alleged ‘safety’ of their own homes has produced all kinds of evil throughout the culture to include the explosion of homosexuality in the last century.” The myth that people are LGBTQ due to abuse is a claim frequently made by anti-LGBTQ organizations to promote harmful “ex-gay” therapy.

Yet these efforts at cleaning up their image still fail to address the most substantial criticisms of the church's policies.