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Age of mythology third party updating

[Warning: non-historian arguing about history, which is always dangerous and sometimes awful.I will say in my defense that I’m drawing off the work of plenty of good historians like Bryan Ward-Perkins and Angus Maddison whom I interpret as agreeing with me.

Guess you fell victim to the Myth Of The Warring States Period.” What about the Bronze Age? Every other historical age name is instantly understood by everyone to refer to both a time and a place. That’s because Europe at that time had 500 years to recover from the civilizational collapse that demolished its economic and intellectual capacity – a collapse whose immediate aftermath we call “the Dark Ages”.The entire concept is complete and utter horseshit cobbled together by a deluded writer.The term “Dark Ages” was first used in the 14th century by Petrarch, an Italian poet with a penchant for Roman nostalgia.Petrarch used it to describe, well, every single thing that had happened since the fall of Rome. Surely no period that produced all that can be called ‘dark’!He didn’t rain dark judgment over hundreds of years of human achievement because of historical evidence of any kind, by the way; his entire argument was based on the general feeling that life sucked absolute weasel scrotum ever since Rome went belly-up. All of those are from after the period 500 – 1000 AD.As per Wikipedia: The idea of a Dark Age originated with the Tuscan scholar Petrarch in the 1330s.

Writing of the past, he said: “Amidst the errors there shone forth men of genius; no less keen were their eyes, although they were surrounded by darkness and dense gloom”.

The term “World War I” was invented by Ernst Haeckel, who was not a historian, based on his personal opinion that it seemed to be a war, and involve the whole world, and be the first one to do so.

The term “Cold War” was invented by George Orwell, who was not a historian, based only on his personal opinion that it seemed conflict-y but without much actual fighting.

In fact, you probably could have taken a similar picture at the time, with an east/west instead of north/south axis.

From The Muslims of Andalusia: I get that this is just a pun I’m taking too seriously.

And that the people I am disagreeing with are not historians themselves, but other non-historians trying to interpret historians’ work in a popular way that I interpret as wrong.